Audie Murphy

If we honor veterans today, who is their hero? If you are a military buff or served our country during the World War II era, then you already know about Audie Murphy, the most decorated World War II soldier.


No Name On The Bullet (1959) gets my vote as Audie Murphy’s best picture. I first became aware of this one back in the early 90s, I think, when Joe Dante mentioned it in an interview. Thanks, Joe!

I was introduced to Audie this week, thanks to Dale Smith of Caldwell. Smith, a Navy man himself who served in the late 50s, brought several Internet printouts.
Smith suggested a story in the paper about the veteran from Texas.

Reading up on Murphy a bit last night, I came across a 1961 interview that appeared in TV Guide:
“I’m not an actor. I don’t even like actors. By that I mean I have nothing in common with them. They’re dedicated souls with just one driving goal in life, and I’m not. I don’t malign them – I just don’t spend any time with them.”
Another one (I found it in Last Of The Cowboy Heroes):
“I’m here in [Hollywood] because it’s where I have something to do. But I don’t do it well.”